Ghost Stories · Haunted Locations · Haunted Travel · Southern US

Haunted Charleston

Charleston is often ranked among the most haunted cities in America, coming in at number seven on this list. On our most recent trip here I looked up some of the most haunted spots and made a trail. Enjoy your walk through this haunted town!

Stop 1: The Old City Jail, 21 Magazine Street

The first stop is the Old City Jail. It’s actually said to be the most haunted spot in Charleston! One ghost that’s said to haunt here is Lavinia Fisher, the first female serial killer. Her last words were said to be, “If you have a message for the devil tell me now, for I will be seeing him in a moment.” She’s been seen walking the halls of the jail and some have claimed to have captured her voice saying, “the devil.”

Old City Jail

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Stop 2: Unitarian Cemetery, 4 Archdale Street

Unitarian Cemetery is haunted by a lady in white who evidence points to be a long lost love of none other than Edgar Allan Poe. Anna Ravenel belonged to a wealthy family in Charleston who didn’t think he was good enough for her, forcing them apart. When Anna became sick and died they barred him from the funeral and didn’t give her a headstone so he wouldn’t know where to mourn her. She’s now said to wander the cemetery while she waits for him.

Lady in White

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Stop 3: Poogan’s Porch, 72 Queen Street

A popular restaurant, Poogan’s Porch is also noted to be haunted. Sisters Zoe and Elizabeth lived in the home turned eatery for many years. Elizabeth passed away in 1945 which crushed her sister. Zoe is said to still haunt the home today as she looks for Elizabeth.

Zoe & Elizabeth

Stop 4: Circular Graveyard, 150 Meeting Street

This cemetery is noted as being one of the most haunted in the state! From floating lights to ghostly apparitions to a woman feeling someone breathing down her neck, this place has a little bit of everything!

Circular Graveyard

Stop 5: The Powder Magazine, 72 Cumberland Street

One of the oldest buildings in town this building is home to many shadow figures. It’s also seems to be home to the spirit of pirate Anne Bonny, who’s said to haunt here as well as other spots around town.

Powder Magazine

Stop 6: Saint Philip’s Graveyard, 142 Church Street

Saint Philip’s Graveyard is the final resting place of Sue Howard Hardy. She passed away in 1888 shortly after giving birth to a still born child. She’s said to haunt the cemetery still and has even been seen in a photograph mourning an infant’s grave.

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Sue Howard Hardy

Stop 7: Dock Street Theatre, 135 Church Street

This theater has made the list of 30 most haunted spots in the country! Formerly a hotel, this building is well over 350 years old. Many former actors as well as theater goers are said to haunt the building. One of the most encountered spirits is Nettie who frequented the hotel in her day when she became a prostitute. She had come to Charleston to look for a better life and started working at the nearby church, but it seems society continued to look down on her. She eventually became a prostitute, which didn’t necessarily help with how people looked at her. One night she went out onto a balcony at the hotel and was screaming at anyone that would walk by, despite the fact there was a storm coming in. The priest from the church where she used to work tried to talk her down, but it wasn’t any use; she was struck by lightning and killed, still haunting the building to this day.

Dock Street Theatre & Nettie

Stop 8: Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon, 122 East Bay Street

Beneath the Old Exchange Building is the Provost Dungeon, which housed many prisoners from pirates to war prisoners during the revolution. This dark and damp dungeon was a miserable place to be as you can imagine. It’s said that visitors can still hear the cries and moans of those imprisoned.

Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon

Stop 9: Battery Carriage House Inn, 20 South Battery

Rooms 3, 8, & 10 are said to be the most haunted at this hotel! Room 3 is haunted by orbs and one couple reported them turning on their cell phone. Room 8 is seems to be the worst as it is haunted by a headless torso which one visitor reported to have growled at him (no. thank. you.). Room 10 is haunted by a man known as the “gentleman ghost,” who will sometime just get into bed with you and go to sleep.

Haunted Rooms

Stop 10: White Point Garden, 2 Murray Boulevard

While it’s a beautiful park today, this garden got it’s haunted reputation as it was the location of many executions. Charleston was frequented by pirates and this is where they were hanged. Over the course of 5 weeks, 49 pirates were executed here. Many claim to still see them lurking in the trees.

White Point Garden

Bonus Stops:

Angel Oak, 3688 Angel Oak Road, John’s Island, SC

Just outside of Charleston to the south is the Angel Oak, a tree that stands at nearly 500 years old. Being that old it has certainly seen some things! The tree is said to be haunted by glowing spirits, though sometimes these apparitions turn to flames. A newlywed couple that was married at the tree came back that night and saw the glowing figures. Everything changed though when the husband attempted to carve a heart into one of the branches. Almost like they were protecting the tree, a fiery form began to move around the couple. They ran back to their car and when they had left the tree they said the gentle glowing forms returned.

Angel Oak

Magnolia Cemetery, 70 Cunnington Avenue

Just north of downtown Charleston is Magnolia Cemetery. There are 35,000 people buried here so it’s hard to say just who is haunting you. Many claim to feel unwanted or watched while in the cemetery. While here I not only felt watched but I got turned around and walked in the opposite direction from my car for what felt like forever. I kept walking and waiting for my landmark to come up, but nothing. That was when I realized I walked about 200 yards deeper into the cemetery. I had been walking on the main road so I have no idea how I got so lost; unless, someone turned me that way….

Magnolia Cemetery

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