Cryptids · Ghost Stories · Midwestern US · Urban Legends

Urban Legends, Part 2

This next round of urban legends will take us to the Midwestern United States! Starting off with….

Ohio

Back in 1972 there were several sightings of a werewolf in the town of Defiance which is about an hour from Toledo. Though many sightings took place near the train tracks, several claim the wolf also tried to get into their homes. It was described as being over 6 feet tall, stood on two feet, and some even said it was wearing jeans.

Reference

Reference

Indiana

Indiana is home to one of the spookiest cemeteries! 100 Steps Cemetery, as the name implies, has 100 steps leading to the top of the hill where the cemetery is located. Legend says you have to walk up the stairs at midnight, counting as you go. Once you reach the top, you’ll be shown how you will die. Next, walk back down the stairs and count them again. If you get 100 again, what you were shown was false. But if the number is different…..

Reference

Reference

Michigan

Detroit is said to be home to a terrifying cryptid: the Nain Rouge (red dwarf). It’s said to bring misfortune, beginning with the founder of Detroit. He was warned to appease the dwarf but chose to ignore the advice; he was later in financial ruin after encountering the dwarf. Other sightings include:

1763: Before the Battle of Bloody Run

1805: Before the Great Fire

1813: Before Detroit was surrendered to the British during the War of 1812

1976: Before one of the worst ice storms in the city’s history

Reference

Lake Michigan is also said to be home to an area similar to the Bermuda Triangle with mysterious disappearances and alien sightings going back to the 1800s.

Reference

Illinois

Forest Park is said to be home to ghost elephants. There was a horrible train wreck in 1918 that left 85 circus performers as well as many animals dead. People claim to see and hear elephants in the area of the cemetery where the mass grave of the circus performers rests.

Reference

Reference

Iowa

There’s a statue in Oakland Cemetery in Iowa City that’s said to be cursed. Known as “The Black Angel,” it is said to bring misfortune to those who come near it. Touching or kissing the statue will result in death; pregnant women walking under it are said to suffer miscarriages. Another legend says it gets a shade darker each year on Halloween.

Reference

Reference

Missouri

Just a half hour from Saint Louis is Wildwood, which is home to Lawler Ford Road, aka Zombie Road. It’s a trail for hiking/biking where many claim to see shadow figures and other ghostly apparitions. Many are said to suffer freak accidents in the area as well as drowning in the nearby river, making it a hot spot for paranormal activity.

As with many secluded areas, this road has become a bit of a lovers’ lane, making it prone to urban legends. The name Zombie Road comes from the legend of the Zombie Killer, a man who lived in the woods and would attack people on the road.

Reference

Reference

Reference

Minnesota

The northern part of the state is said to be home to the cryptid known as a Wendigo. At 15 feet tall, the word “wendigo” means “evil spirit that devours mankind.” They are constantly starving and, since it takes becoming a cannibal to turn into one, guess what they’re always looking to eat?

Reference

Reference

Arkansas

Many states have their version of Bigfoot and Arkansas is no different. Known as the Boggy Creek Monster, this seven foot tall cryptid has been spotted as far back as the 1830s and continues to be seen to this day in rural parts of the state.

Reference

Wisconsin

Though no exact location is given, this tale from Wisconsin is a classic urban legend. The story tells of a woman that was murdered the night of her wedding. She haunts the area (presumably a bridge because the legend is titled “Bloody Bride Bridge”) and appears to drivers in their rear view mirrors. This seems like a very classic woman in white or hitchhiking ghost legend!

Reference

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s